Gorse in focus

News article |

The Limestone Coast (LC) Landscape Board is urging landholders to be on the lookout for declared weed gorse (Ulex europaeus).

With a small number of isolated infestations across the lower Limestone Coast, keeping on top of gorse infestations is imperative to prevent new incursions of the invasive weed. As part of the focus on the weed, Landscape Officers for the LC Landscape Board are working with landholders who have previously been involved in gorse control programs to ensure infestations have been contained.

“To support this, we’re encouraging all landholders and the wider community to be vigilant and to look out for gorse on their property. This includes becoming familiar with what it looks like and where it grows,” said Limestone Coast Landscape Board, Team Leader of Southern Operations, Lizzie Doyle.

“Once established in an area, gorse can be costly to control.”

“Identifying and managing the weed is critical to protecting our regions agricultural industries and environment from its impacts.”

Gorse’s spiny thickets are unpalatable to livestock and the weed competes with pasture and can easily take over paddocks. It can also displace native vegetation and grow large thickets which harbour pest animals such as rabbits and foxes.

Producing a large number of seeds that can remain viable in soil for over 25 years, managing gorse can be a challenging and time consuming task.

“The revisiting of gorse infestation sites by Landscape Officers complements the control efforts already undertaken by the LC Landscape Board to control the weed on roadsides,” said Ms Doyle.

There are a number of methods that can be used to control the weed and eradication is possible with follow up control each year.

“Collaboration with affected landholders is key to preventing gorse spreading across the lower Limestone Coast.”

“Our Landscape Officers are here to support landholders to identify and manage gorse infestations on their property, we encourage landholders to reach out to our Landscape Officers for advice. “

“We all have a role to play in protecting our region from the impacts of gorse and by working together we can eradicate this weed,” said Ms Doyle.

Gorse in focus

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