Reviving a Natural Gem: Karst Spring Restoration Project begins its journey to environmental rejuvenation

News article |

The recent purchase of an Eight Mile Creek property in the Limestone Coast is a bold move by the Limestone Coast Landscape Board. The purchase will support the LC Landscape Board’s “Making every drop count” approach to protecting our region’s water resources for the ecosystems and industries dependent on them.

The recent purchase of an Eight Mile Creek property in the Limestone Coast is a bold move by the Limestone Coast Landscape Board. The purchase will support the LC Landscape Board’s “Making every drop count” approach to protecting our region’s water resources for the ecosystems and industries dependent on them.

The unique property includes three karst springs. The surrounding land, once a thriving wetland, is a nationally threatened ecological system which has restoration potential.

Chair of the Limestone Coast Landscape Board Dr. Penny Schulz said, “It is rare that a private property of such environmental significance comes on the market, complete with the ability to restore the wetlands without impacting neighbouring properties.”

“Iconic karst springs such as these, like Ewens Ponds, are important to our community but many people don’t realise just how rare they are globally and that they are hidden around our southern coast,” said Dr. Schulz.

The aim of the project is to restore land that has been farmed for many decades, to its former wetland status by holding water back in the landscape, fed by the springs. This will provide wetland habitat for native plants and animals to re-establish populations, as well as providing agricultural benefits from a healthy landscape. The project will include the preparation of management plans, undertaking baseline monitoring and cultivating partnerships in the early stages, and later move on to on-ground restoration works.

Acknowledging the sale, previous landowners Kevin and Susanne Smith highlighted that the project is an opportunity for agriculture, the environment and even local tourism.

“We’ve always known this land must be kept wet for it to remain healthy – it’s great this has finally been recognised and we will all benefit.”

“Agriculture and the environment can work together, and in doing so, it will help secure the water for our farming community into the future,” said Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

To find out more about the Karst Springs Restoration Project, go to Limestone Coast Landscape Board website Conversations page https://engage.lclandscapesa.c... and follow the page to receive project updates.

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