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Pests Cost Us All – Invasive Grasses Workshop at Waddikee

News release
05 October 2016

Land managers are invited to attend an invasive grasses workshop at Waddikee on Monday, 17 October.

Natural Resources Eyre Peninsula Landscapes Program Coordinator Grant Lomman said it was important to increase knowledge and skills to address threats to sustainable agriculture such as the identification and management of highly-invasive grasses.

“In coming months, we will be running a series of information and training sessions, workshops and demonstration sites for priority pest plant species, such as invasive grasses and Weeds of National Significance, like African boxthorn and blackberry,” Mr Lohman said.

“The Natural Resources Eyre Peninsula project also looks at predators impacting on agricultural production such as wild dogs, foxes and feral cats.”

The Invasive Grasses Workshop starts 1pm at the Waddikee Sports Club, with a weed identification session, information on invasive grass species threat to agriculture within the region and a discussion on control methods.

“We are lucky to have Chris Brodie, Weeds Botanist from the State Herbarium of South Australia, attending on the day to assist land managers in the identification of invasive grasses and other weed species,” Mr Lomman said.

“Land managers can bring examples of plants they are unsure of for identification. Chris will explain the differences between invasive species such as African lovegrass, Buffel grass, Texan and Chilean needle grasses and compare them to native grass species.

Natural Resources Eyre Peninsula staff will be there to discuss control options.

“We travel to Peter Thomson’s property to look at a demonstration site where several invasive grass control methods have been applied to view their impact.”

Natural Resources Eyre Peninsula Senior Natural Resources Officer Iggy Honan said two trial sites demonstrating the control method had been established at Waddikee using differing rates of glyphosate and Flupropanate, as well as some spot treatment.

“We are also planning a follow-up visit to the site in 2017 to review the effectiveness of the control methods used over the longer term,” Mr Honan said.

Funding for the workshop was provided by the Australian Government.

Natural Resources Eyre Peninsula would like to work with local landholders to help improve the management and control of invasive grasses and the management of native grasses in eastern Eyre Peninsula.

For more information, call Iggy Honan on 8628 2077.

More information

Communications and Engagement Officer

8688 3111

dewnr.nrepadmin@sa.gov.au